Resources

The Importance of Shared Book Reading with Children

Reading to children is known to be vitally important for language development. However, while we are used to the traditional format of reading aloud to children while they sit and listen, it is important to actually encourage a dialogue with the child regarding the book. This technique of shared reading is known as “dialogic reading”.

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The Importance of Routines in Child Development

Routines play a significant role in a child’s learning and development. Such routines we carry out in the day include meal times, bath time, and bed time routines, as well as those embedded in transitioning from one part of the day to the next. As routines are predictable and occur at the same day with

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Phonological Processes

Phonowodital Pwocesses Dey tant be as twicky as you tink! What are they? Some big words to mean patterns of errors children make when learning to speak, to make speaking easier. These errors reflect a difficulty in organising the patterns of speech sounds in the brain. What do they sound like? When a child goes

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Selective Mutism – A Guide for parents and teachers

By Marie Tsilimos What is Selective Mutism? Selective Mutism (SM) is a relatively rare anxiety disorder that causes children to experience difficulties when communicating in certain social situations such as at school, with relatives or friends. Children with Selective Mutism typically speak in situations where they are comfortable, such as at home with family members

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Vocal Hygiene

Vocal Abuse Voice misuse/vocal abuse is vocal behaviours leading to traumatic tissue changes of the vocal folds. Our voice is generated from the vibrations of the vocal folds. The vibrations which move these folds is powered by breath support. Vocal trauma can be caused by life stresses, reflux disease, psychosocial issues (i.e. anxiety, depression), environmental

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What is Joint Attention?

By Hayley Tippets While playing with a baby, you press the button on a pop-up box, the baby looks at the box with delight, giggles and looks back at you, such as to suggest, “that was exciting, do that again!”. This look by the baby from the pop-up box to the adult, to gain the

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Raising Bilingual Children

By Stephanie Der Children are born with the capacity to learn the language(s) that they are exposed to. They are able to attend to the different speech sounds they hear around them, and learn to produce these sounds. The majority of children will have no difficulty learning more than one language as they grow and

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I just want him to say Mum

by Kylie Ward | Aug 2020 When a child has speech, language or other developmental delays, often one of the first things we hear from parents is ‘I just want him to say Mum (or Dad)’. It’s a goal that’s full of meaning, and intent, and it’s an utterance that is so special to a

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What is AAC?

When you hear the term “communication”, most people immediately think of the words we say in conversation or on the phone, or what we read in books or through technology. But what about those of us who cannot speak or have difficulty speaking to people around them? How do they communicate their wants and needs

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Impacts of language disorders in the classroom

Language skills underpin a substantial part of academic learning, and determine how well children learn within the school environment. A language disorder refers to impaired understanding and/or production of spoken or written language, and may involve disorders with the form of language (morphology, syntax, phonology), the content of language (semantics), and/or function of language in

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Is your Child Stuttering?

Stuttering is a highly variable communication disorder that affects many young children. Many children exhibit early signs of stuttering or disfluencies during their preschool years. While it is not uncommon for children to ‘outgrow’ their stutter, it is impossible to determine whether stuttering is going to resolve itself or become a life-long ongoing problem.  As

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A few statistics on speech therapy

The prevalence of speech and language impairment in school aged children is significant, with one study in NSW (McLeod & McKinnon, 2007) revealing that 13% of children at primary and secondary schools have a communication disorder. Australian teachers report expressive language difficulties in around 21% of children when they enter school, and receptive language difficulties

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Expressive Grammar Tasks

Correcting incorrect sentences Give the students examples of incorrect grammar and syntax and have them identify the errors and choose the suitable replacement. Initially they may need a choice of two answers but as they progress they should be able to generate some of their own responses. E.g. The mouses ate the cheese, The girl

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Sequencing Activities

Story retell tasks Using books that are very visual to help with visualising/verbalising skills i.e. helping the student to retain a visual image to help with memory and recall. As you progress through the story highlight important and unusual events, talk about how the characters feel, try predicting what will happen next, before you leave

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Word Retrieval Activities

Riddles Choose an object e.g. animal, furniture, food, transport etc and give clues without revealing the name of the object e.g. it’s a large grey animal, it has big floppy ears, it has a trunk. Category games Games that involve generating items from a set category in a given time period e.g. tell me as

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Ten Tips for Encouraging Your Child’s Speech and Language Development

1. Play face-to-face games with your child For instance, bubbles, throwing a ball, row row your boat or peek-a-boo. These games provide opportunities to engage with your child using not only your words but also each other’s facial expressions. This promotes your child’s attention and increases social interactions. 2. Expand on words your child is already

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School Readiness: Statistics and Tips

At this time of year, every year, parents find themselves asking if their child will be ready for the brand new world that is primary school. It’s certainly a big step up from pre-school and not just because of the uniforms and shoe-lace tying. Formal schooling presents many new challenges to children in terms of the

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